Vegan pancakes with honey and raspberry

With pancake day approaching we needed to come up with an egg and milk free pancake for my wife, who, since being pregnant, has developed an allergy to them.

Swapping milk is straight forward enough, but what about the egg? Well it turns out that you can use the juice from a can of chick peas, or any legume, as an egg substitute in almost any meal. It goes by the name of Aquafaba. 

Don’t worry the pancakes don’t end up tasting like chickpeas. The almond milk also gives a great flavour to the pancakes, but Soya or any milk would also work.

I like to make mini pancakes using crumpet rings as they are a bit easier to handle.

Ingredients

300ml almond milk
100g self raising flour (sieved)
Pinch of salt
Dairy free spread, like Flora freedom

2 tablespoon of juice from a can of chick peas (lightly beaten)

To serve;

Honey

Raspberries

Method:

Add half the milk to the flour and salt and whisk to a smooth mix. Add the rest of the milk and the chick pea juice and whisk again.

Place a couple of crumpet rings into a small frying pan. Add a small amount of spread to each ring. Pour some batter into the rings and cook on a low heat for several minutes. 

Carefully remove the rings and flip the pancakes. Cook for a few more minutes, until golden in colour.

Serve drizzled in honey and with a handful of raspberries

Parsnip wine

Finally a use for parsnips! I can’t stand them, but this wine is amazing. Well worth the little effort needed and really cheap to make. Watch out though, its pretty strong stuff.

I have a few recipes for this one, from River Cottages ‘booze’ book and ‘drink your own garden’. Here’s how I do it.

Check out my blog on the basics of homebrewing before you start here.

Ingredients:

  • 2 kg parsnips (cut into 5mm pieces)
  • 4.5l water
  • 1.4kg granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons of citric acid (or the juice and rind of 2 lemons.
  • 1 teaspoon tannin (or a strong cup of black tea)
  • 1 teaspoon pectolase (to prevent pectin haze)
  • 1 teaspoon of wine yeast (I use Young’s super wine yeast extract)
  • 1 teaspoon Bentonite
  • 1 campden tablet
  • 1 teaspoon fermentation stopper

Method:

Boil 2.5 litres of water and add the parsnips. Boil for around 20 mins until soft, but not falling apart, otherwise the wine will never clear.

Strain the water from the parsnips into a sterile bucket, add the sugar, citric acid, tannin and pectolase and stir well.

Mix in 2 litres of cold water and finally add your yeast. Cover loosely for 3 days before straining into a demijohn with an airlock.

When fermentation ends add a crushed campden tablet and fermentation stopper, as per the instructions on the packet.

After 24 hrs clear the wine by adding bentonite as per the instructions on the packet.

Finally, siphon the wine into bottles and cork. Age for a minimum of 6 months before drinking.

Vegetable lasagne

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I rarely make a lasagne with meat, I don’t think you really need it. A good dish for when we have visitors, it always goes down well, even with meat eaters.

Serve with a fresh salad and buttered garlic baguettes.

 

 

Serves 4 

Ingredients:

  • Olive oil
  • 1 onion (peeled and ends trimmed)
  • 1 green pepper (top, seeds & pith removed)
  • 100g Purple sprouting broccoli (ends trimmed)
  • 1 leek (ends trimmed)
  • 2 cloves of garlic (grated)
  • 1 tin chopped tomatoes
  • 2 tbsp tomato puree
  • 2 tsp Oregano
  • Salt & pepper
  • Lasagne pasta
  • Jar of lasagne cheese sauce
  • Cheddar cheese (to top)

Method:

Put the onion, pepper, broccoli & leek into a food processor and blitz. You are aiming for a mince-type consistency, with no big lumps.

Stick some oil in a saucepan and add the veg. Fry for several minutes. Add the garlic,_20170505_114321 tomatoes, puree and oregano. Season and bring to the boil, and cook for about 5 minutes.
Grease a baking dish and add a layer of veg sauce, followed by a layer of pasta, cheese sauce, more pasta, veg sauce, and so on. Finish up on a cheese sauce layer and top with grated cheddar.

Cook in the centre of a pre heated oven at 220 degrees Celsius for about 25 minutes until golden on top.

Garlic flatbread

FB_IMG_1493543549564These taste great with curries. They don’t take much effort, but will need making a little in advance.

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients:

  • 200g white bread flour (sifted) + a little extra
  • 5g salt
  • 100g sourdough starter
  • Tsp of olive oil + a little extra for frying
  • 180 ml warm water (give or take)
  • 1 or 2 garlic cloves, grated (to taste)


Method:

Put the flour and salt into a large bowl and mix together.

Add the starter and olive oil and slowly add the water and mix together to form a dough. It needs to be workable, but slightly wetter will make a better loaf. You can add more or less water depending on how your dough feels. I find it varies slightly every time.

Tip out onto your worktop and knead for 5 minutes. I don’t bother to flour or oil the worktop, I never really found it necessary. There are various ways to knead your dough I like to stretch it out, then roll it back in and give it a 90 degree turn, before stretching it out again.

Put your dough into a lightly oiled bowl and cover loosely with a plastic bag to stop it drying out. Place somewhere warm, I usually put it near our wood-burner or in the conservatory on a warm day.

Leave to prove for several hours until the dough has roughly doubled in size. Sourdough takes longer to develop than bread made with shop bought yeast, but benefits from the extra time, as it develops a better flavour.

Flour your work surface and break your dough into 4 portions. Cover each portion with a coat of flour and squash to around 3 or 4 mm thick.

Heat some olive oil in a frying pan and cook each flatbread for 3 or 4 minutes on each side

Black bread


FB_IMG_1493543260127This recipe contains blood. If you are a fan of black pudding its worth a go. Its not the sort of thing you’d eat every day, but goes really well with soups and stews.

I first tried black bread at Midgardsblot festival in Norway. Its an interesting flavour. Originally found in an early viking age grave in Sweden, it was baked using yeast from the same family as brewing today, pointing to brewing waste being used to rise the bread.

This version is made from a basic sourdough recipe, but cooked using blood.

This fills a 2 lb loaf tin, or 500g proving basket.

Ingredients:

  • 250g white bread flour (sifted)
  • 250g wholemeal flour
  • 10g salt
  • 160g sourdough starter
  • Tsp of olive oil
  • 300ml warm water (give or take)
  • 40 ml dried blood
  • A small amount of rye flour for coating

Method:

Mix the dried blood with the water and whisk to a smooth consistency.

Put the flour and salt into a large bowl and mix together.

Add the starter and olive oil and slowly add the blood solution and mix together to form a slightly sticky dough. It needs to be workable, but slightly wetter will make a better loaf. You can add more or less water depending on how your dough feels. I find it varies slightly every time.

Tip out onto your worktop and knead for 10 minutes. I don’t bother to flour or oil the worktop, I never really found it necessary.

There are various ways to knead your dough I like to stretch it out, then roll it back in and give it a 90 degree turn, before stretching it out again.

Put your dough into a lightly oiled bowl and cover loosely with a plastic bag to stop it drying out. Place somewhere warm, I usually put it near our wood-burner or in the conservatory on a warm day.

Leave to prove for several hours until the dough has roughly doubled in size. Sourdough takes longer to develop than bread made with shop bought yeast, but benefits from the extra time, as it develops a better flavour.

Tip your dough back out onto your work surface and carefully deflate it by poking it with your fingers. Reshape and coat with rye flour

Place it in a lightly greased loaf tin for a square sandwich loaf, or into a heavily floured proving basket, if you have one, for a more traditional loaf. Cover loosely with a plastic bag and leave for another hour or more to prove again. If using a tin, it should rise to the top.

Heat your oven to its highest temperature and boil the kettle. If using the proving basket option also place an oven tray in too heat.

Place some water in a baking tray at the bottom of the oven, this will help to create a good crust on your loaf.

If using the proving basket, tip your bread out onto the hot oven tray and get it in the oven and shut the door, as quick as possible, to avoid heat loss. If using a loaf tin, put your loaf tin in the centre of the oven.

Cook for 10 minutes before dropping the temperature to 200 degrees Celsius if the crust is looking pale, 180 degrees Celsius if the crust is noticeably browning, and 170 degrees Celsius if it seems to be browning quickly. Cook for a further 40 mins.

When using a loaf tin, I like to take it out of the tin for the last 10 minutes.

Remove from the oven, the loaf should sound hollow when you tap it on the bottom.

Leave to cool fully before cutting.